Vegetarian diet doesn't mean less protein diet

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Vegetarian diet doesn't mean less protein diet

The benefits of eating a vegetarian diet are numerous

Vegetarian diet doesn't mean less protein diet

Vegetarian diets are becoming increasingly fashionable. The benefits of eating a vegetarian diet are numerous, but they include reduced risk of heart disease, diabetes, and some malignancies. Vegetarianism is the practise of not eating meat (red meat, poultry, shellfish, etc.).

While non-vegetarians may believe that the vegetarian diet lacks protein, this is not the case. Vegetarian protein sources can provide you with essential nutrients. Indeed, meat is a “full protein package”, meaning it includes protein as well as a variety of other essential elements. If you're a vegetarian, non-meat sources of protein and minerals are available.

You can find protein in these vegetarian sources:

Quinoa

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Quinoa takes only 15 minutes to cook and it is rich in protein, fibre, antioxidants, and minerals. It is a delicious addition to salads, vegetarian burgers, and more.

Tofu

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Tofu is created by coagulating soy milk and forming blocks from the curds. Soft, firm or extremely firm tofu blocks are available. Tofu is a good source of plant-based protein in a vegan diet. It comes in second place among all vegan protein sources.

Pistachios

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Pistachio shelling might be difficult, but it's well worth the effort. Pistachios are not only tasty by the handful, but they may also be used in baked products, salad dressings, and as a fish coating.

Almonds

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Almonds are rich in many nutrients. Protein, good fats, vitamin E, and antioxidants are all abundant in them. Eat almonds with the skin on to get the most nutrition.

Oats

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Oats are a delicious and easy method to boost your protein intake. They are also high in magnesium, zinc, phosphorus, and folate. Despite the fact that oats are not a complete protein, they do include higher-quality protein than other widely eaten grains such as rice and wheat. Oats may be used in a number of dishes, ranging from morning oats to pancakes. You can also grind them into flour and use them in baking.

Vegetables

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Vegetables are commonly thought to only include vitamins and minerals, as well as a little amount of carbs and proteins. However, other vegetables, such as spinach, potatoes, broccoli, asparagus, and even sweet potatoes, have a higher protein content. Though the amount of protein in each of them isn't comparable to non-vegetarian sources, at about 5 gm per cup of cooked vegetables, it's still a good deal.

Fruits

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Fruits actually contain more protein than you may expect. Tangerines, apricots, guava, kiwi, blackberries, bananas, and avocados are among the top contenders. To get your share of protein and tasty whole fruits, include them generously in your vegetarian diet.

Beans

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Beans with a high protein content per serving include kidney, black, and most other types. Chickpeas are a good source of complex carbohydrates, fibre, iron, folate, phosphorus, potassium, manganese, and a number of beneficial plant components. Furthermore, studies suggest that a diet high in beans and other legumes can help lower cholesterol, blood sugar levels, blood pressure, and even belly fat.

Seeds

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Seeds are abundant in protein and unsaturated fats, just like nuts. Sunflower or pumpkin seeds are good to eat. You may also add hemp seeds to your porridge or toast in the morning to meet your protein needs.

Making the switch to a vegetarian diet is a big step. It aligns you with your beliefs, especially when it comes to animal care, and enables you to eat without missing out on nutrition.