FONRWA joins a society against stray dog menace
FONRWA joins a society against stray dog menace
Ramesh Kumar
FONRWA joins a society against stray dog menace
 

FONRWA joins a society against stray dog menace

There are many who raise their voice for the rights of stray dogs, but none for the victims of dog bite. Here is a society wedded to the cause of victims. Styled as Stray Dog Free Movement, the society offers financial and legal assistence to dog bite victims from economically weaker sections of the society.

The movement, along with Federation of Noida Residents Welfare Association (FONRWA), observed fast at Jantar Mantar, New Delhi. They called for stray dog free society and handed a memorandum to the Lok Sabha Speaker Sumitra Mahajan urging her to do something to protect the rights of the people against animal rights activists.

Pointing to the alleged exploitation of common men by the “so-called” animal rights activists, President of FONRWA, NP Singh, expressed his anguish over the lackadaisical attitude of the authorities in dealing with stray dogs, who have become a public nuisance. The agencies responsible for routine sterilisation and vaccination, he said, are found wanting in dischraging their duties.

Highlighting the difficulties many residents from across the city face due to stray dog menace, Secretary General of FONRWA, AN Dhavan, stressed the need for a law to protect them from animal activists at a time when cases of dog bite are increasing every year in across Delhi NCR.

Kochouseph Chittilappilly, an industrialist from Kerala who is spearheading the movement, said, "The need of the hour is not to discuss how to protect stray dogs, but to find a lasting solution to the menace. I, for one, believe sheltering, vaccinating, sterilising and putting to sleep all rabid dogs in a painless manner is the way forward.”

“It is with this intention, I, with some likeminded ‘human lovers’, constituted the Stray Dog Free Movement. It is a society that helps stray dog victims by way of treatment, financial and legal aid, and strives to build dog shelters in association with local authorities as well as NGOs,” he added.

Chittilappilly concluded his speech with a message: “Let our love for animals not abdicate us from our responsibility towards fellow humans."

Around 2.25 crore people are bitten by dogs in India every year. Among them, around 20,000 die of rabies. The victims mostly happen to be ordinary people who can’t afford anti-rabies injection which costs anywhere between Rs 16,000 and Rs 28,000.