See someone driving on the wrong side? You are probably in Dwarka
See someone driving on the wrong side? You are probably in Dwarka
Akhilesh Pandey
See someone driving on the wrong side? You are probably in Dwarka
Photo: Akhilesh Pandey
See someone driving on the wrong side? You are probably in Dwarka

Do you regularly spot cars with tinted glasses while you drive to and from office? Do you often encounter drivers who whisk past you on the wrong side? Chances are pretty high that you are a resident or regular commuter of Dwarka.

Incidentally, Dwarka is fast becoming a haven for people who flout driving rules. This is because the traffic police don’t seem to be doing much. Despite their claims about punitive action and challans, there is no change in the wrong practices.    

Not just cars but bikes, heavy vehicles, school vans and DTC buses are also seen violating traffic rules. Residents of Dwarka say that this translates to a tough situation in the morning hours, particularly at traffic signals.

Anurag Behel, a resident of Shruti Apartments, Sector 7, who has regularly been writing to the authorities on this subject, said, “In the morning, school vans violate traffic rules to save time. They drive carelessly and create a dangerous situation not only for the kids inside but for other commuters as well. Vehicles also violate traffic rules by driving on the wrong side, which is the worst near the traffic signal zone near Dwarka Court and Palam Flyover.”

Jumping red lights, too, is a common feature on the streets of Dwarka. This is particularly common at the Sector 3 signal, the signals near MRV bus stand, KM Chowk, Vivekananda Chowk and the chowks of Sector 6, 10, 5 and 11. In fact, such traffic violations are often seen near the DCP office.

“The violators have no fear of the traffic police, as they usually do not take action against the drivers of heavy vehicles and big, branded cars. The traffic police should ensure a safe space for commuters who follow the rules,” said a resident of Sector 12, MP Singh.

Residents of the sub-city say that vehicles with tinted glasses are often seen around wine and beer shops or in isolated lanes and roads. Often, such vehicles pass the traffic police who do not seem to take any notice.

Sanchita Sharma, a resident of Sector 10, said, “I cannot understand why the traffic police choose to ignore such vehicles. Checking of tinted-glass vehicles should be strict. Also, of late, I have not been seeing the traffic police riders who chase and catch violators. To ensure road safety in Dwarka, there is an urgent need to adopt a more serious approach.”